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Ever wondered about someone you pass on the sidewalk, see in the grocery store, or heard mentioned in stories? This is our attempt to track those people down, and grill them, lightly.
Will you be my friend? 052213 AE 1 Capital City Weekly Ever wondered about someone you pass on the sidewalk, see in the grocery store, or heard mentioned in stories? This is our attempt to track those people down, and grill them, lightly.

Wednesday, May 22, 2013

Story last updated at 5/22/2013 - 2:04 pm

Will you be my friend?

Ever wondered about someone you pass on the sidewalk, see in the grocery store, or heard mentioned in stories? This is our attempt to track those people down, and grill them, lightly.

Stacie Tinney stood behind the counter of the Heritage Coffee company bar at the RGA downtown grocery store. She had a fun-loving, easy going "Ain't no thing" swing in her stride, her expressions, her interactions with customers.

Perhaps that was why it wasn't easy to tease much out of her. She's the kind of woman, who, had she saved dozens of whales from death or won a multi-million dollar lottery, she might just flip her wrist. Ain't no thing.

But she is something, actually, lots of things. She's part Tlingit, part Yupik. She grew up in Kotzebue picking blueberries on the Noatak River. She moved to Hoonah just before high school.

The school's physical education teacher was looking for more people for the wresting team. She went for it, only after convincing her dad she'd be limited to competing against other females.

"I was bony; no meat on me," Tinney said.

She enjoyed the endurance aspect of the sport.

"I felt rough in the very beginning but the more I pushed myself, the better I felt," she said.

Tinney did wrestle some females, but usually she was up against male competitors. She recalled a time she crushed a Ketchikan wrestler in a local tournament.

"I beat him so fast and pinned him that when we went to Ketchikan he wouldn't wrestle me (again)," she said. "It made me mad because I was pumped up and ready to wrestle."

Tinney's dad relocated to Juneau before she graduated, so she lived with Hoonah's chief of police for her last two years as she was good friends with his daughter.

She trained and took classes to become a volunteer EMS responder and had her first child, a daughter named Dakota, a couple years after graduation.

Tinney moved to Juneau in 2003, "for a change."

She's married now, and said she fell in love with her husband's eyes the first time they met. They have a daughter, Winter, who is four now.

"She has pretty positive characteristics," Tinney said. "She's a really smart little girl."

She also has a son, Troy.

"I'm a people person," Tinney said. "I think I'm an outgoing, pretty happy person. I can't really complain about much."

Tinney said she'd like to eventually own a home. She said she loves her job and the interaction it allows her with people.

As customers came and left she humored them, even when they only thought they were funny.

"I care so much," she said. "Some people love foam in their lattes, some don't. We're like a family here. We work very well together."

Amanda Compton is the staff writer for Capital City Weekly. She can be reached at amanda.compton@capweek.com.


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