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A couple of weeks ago I was asked if I could do an article and recipe with bacon. That’s like asking a cow to make milk. I can probably incorporate bacon into nearly every dish I make.
Meals with Midgi: Bacon wrapped caribou roast 030613 AE 1 Capital City Weekly A couple of weeks ago I was asked if I could do an article and recipe with bacon. That’s like asking a cow to make milk. I can probably incorporate bacon into nearly every dish I make.

Kelly Moore

Bacon wrapped caribou roast. The roast can be substituted with beef or pork when caribou is not readily available.

Wednesday, March 06, 2013

Story last updated at 3/7/2013 - 1:12 pm

Meals with Midgi: Bacon wrapped caribou roast

 A couple of weeks ago I was asked if I could do an article and recipe with bacon. That’s like asking a cow to make milk. I can probably incorporate bacon into nearly every dish I make.

Bacon has become the celebrity food. Looking at restaurant menus these days, you will find at least one or two recipes with a unique bacon concept. Maple bacon donuts are all the rage, and as reported previously, Juneau’s very own The Rookery has bacon jam on the menu. Bacon is everywhere.

It is the topic of comedian Jim Gaffigan’s best bit. I quote him all the time, “bacon bits are the confetti of food.” I couldn’t agree more. There is some mystical epicurean quality about bacon. The salty crispiness pairs so wonderfully with something sweet. It is the ultimate salad topper and everyone knows a baked potato is properly dressed when bacon is sprinkled on top. Bacon is its own food group. In fact, it’s so special that even vegetarians eat fake bacon. They too want the salty savory yumminess only bacon possesses. I believe in their world it’s called Facon (FAKE - CON). I will never understand why vegetarians want to eat food that tastes like meat. I mean isn’t the point of being a vegetarian to give up meat? So if they eat fake meat is that somehow cheating? My feeling is that even vegetarians know how special bacon is.

As you can see I am quite enamored of bacon. Now, the big question, what to make? I could try something simple like a BLT with a special aioli, or go really extreme with bacon, wrapped in bacon and then topped with bacon bits. But, that’s not really a recipe one can make for dinner. Is it?

I opted for a new recipe that I had been perfecting for my husband, Grant. Bacon wrapped caribou roast. As many know, I have a five-year supply of caribou, thanks to Grant’s successful hunting excursion in Adak. A few weeks ago I made a bacon wrapped caribou roast with a mushroom red wine sauce and the hits on my Facebook page were amazing. Who knew caribou could be so interesting. Or was it the bacon? Comments were everything from “Delicious!” to “Looks like something from an alien.” I admit the picture wasn’t very good, so there were quite a few extra terrestrial comments. I thanked everyone for posting and said that it indeed did taste out of this world.

What is especially nice is how easy it is to make this recipe. If you do not have access to caribou or would prefer to not eat something from Rudolf’s family, a beef roast would be perfectly fine. The primary ingredient is the bacon. Not only does it keep the roast moist, but the drippings from the bacon and the roast make the most incredible sauce.

This week I present a simple and hearty recipe to celebrate the perfect food, bacon: Bacon Wrapped Caribou Roast.

Until next time...

Eat and enjoy,

Midgi

BACON WRAPPED

CARIBOU ROAST

1 3-4lb roast

1lb thick cut bacon

1 large yellow or white onion, thinly sliced

1/2 cup beef broth

1/2 cup red wine

3 cloves garlic, crushed

1 cup sliced mushrooms

1 tablespoon fresh thyme

Salt and pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Start with one pound of thick cut bacon strips and lay them across your cutting board. Layer them about 1/4 inch on top of each other so that there aren’t any gaps. Place the roast on top of the layered bacon and slowly wrap each strip of bacon around. If needed, use a toothpick to secure the bacon.

In large roasting pan or Dutch oven layer onion slices, garlic and pour in broth and wine. Place roast on top and cover. Roast for 1 hour and 15 minutes, or until internal temperature is 135-140 degrees.

Once cooked, remove from pan and set aside to rest. Add mushrooms and additional broth or wine, as desired, and simmer on stove until reduced. Add thyme and simmer additional 5 minutes.

Serve with garlic mashed potatoes and glazed carrots or your favorite salad.


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