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JUNEAU - What started as one Alaska Native woman's crusade for equal housing and access to public facilities in Juneau in the 1940s Juneau ultimately led to the very first anti-discrimination law in the United States. The woman was Elizabeth Peratrovich, whom some have dubbed "Alaska's Rosa Parks."
ALASKAN. NATIVE. WOMAN. ACTIVIST. 020613 NEWS 1 Capital City Weekly JUNEAU - What started as one Alaska Native woman's crusade for equal housing and access to public facilities in Juneau in the 1940s Juneau ultimately led to the very first anti-discrimination law in the United States. The woman was Elizabeth Peratrovich, whom some have dubbed "Alaska's Rosa Parks."
Wednesday, February 06, 2013

Story last updated at 2/6/2013 - 1:38 pm

ALASKAN. NATIVE. WOMAN. ACTIVIST.

JUNEAU - What started as one Alaska Native woman's crusade for equal housing and access to public facilities in Juneau in the 1940s Juneau ultimately led to the very first anti-discrimination law in the United States. The woman was Elizabeth Peratrovich, whom some have dubbed "Alaska's Rosa Parks."

Beginning on First Friday, Feb. 1, the Alaska State Museum in Juneau presents "Alaskan. Native. Woman. Activist," an exhibit commemorating Elizabeth Peratrovich's groundbreaking civil rights advocacy, which culminated with her impassioned speech before the Alaska territorial senate, largely credited with the territory's Anti-Discrimination Act of 1945. "Alaskan. Native. Woman. Activist" will be on display through March 16, 2013.

At 1:30 p.m. on Feb. 16, the Alaska State Museum celebrates Elizabeth Peratrovich Day with a presentation by Selina Everson, a member of the Alaska Native Sisterhood Executive Committee and former three-term president, followed by a special screening of the "For the Rights of All: Ending Jim Crow in Alaska," a documentary by Jeffry Lloyd Silverman. Production of the film was made possible in part by Native American Public Telecommunications, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and the Rasmuson Foundation.


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