Speakingout
Sixty seven percent of parents say that they would like it if students were able to use their phones in school. Seventy-four percent of high schoolers would like to use their phones, too. Many people think differently, but a lot more people think the same as including me. Cell phones should be allowed in school.
Floyd Dryden Essays: Cell phones in school 012313 SPEAKINGOUT 1 Capital City Weekly Sixty seven percent of parents say that they would like it if students were able to use their phones in school. Seventy-four percent of high schoolers would like to use their phones, too. Many people think differently, but a lot more people think the same as including me. Cell phones should be allowed in school.
Wednesday, January 23, 2013

Story last updated at 1/23/2013 - 2:07 pm

Floyd Dryden Essays: Cell phones in school

Sixty seven percent of parents say that they would like it if students were able to use their phones in school. Seventy-four percent of high schoolers would like to use their phones, too. Many people think differently, but a lot more people think the same as including me. Cell phones should be allowed in school.

First, the students could use their cell phones as calculators. Just in case there are not enough calculators in class, you could use your phone. Eighty six percent of students say that they would use their phones for a calculator if they were allowed to. To prevent cheating, the teachers should consider having the kids put their cell phones face up, so the teacher can see if a student is texting or using a calculator when they're not supposed to.

Secondly, if cell phones were allowed at school, they could be used as tools to enhance learning. The students could do research when there are not enough computers. Sixty-eight percent of students say they would use their phones to take notes in class. Forty-four percent of students mention using them for downloading online textbooks, which would be useful because textbooks are heavy to carry around. Seventy-eight percent say they would use them to check their grades.

Lastly, just in case an emergency happens, the students would have their cell phones. Emergencies do happen, and if the students don't have their phones they can't contact people, or if an emergency happens at home and someone's in the hospital, they wouldn't be able to call their cell phone and tell them. Thirty-two percent of kids leave their cell phones at home because they can't use them at school, and out of the sixty-eight percent that do bring their cell phones to school, twenty percent put them in their lockers leaving only forty-eight percent of students that can contact or be contacted in school. If strong winds or an earthquake happens, they could take down telephone lines, and if the kids don't have their cell phones their parents will worry, making lots of parents maybe take off from work to go to the school and see if their student is OK. It can also be the other way around: if the student wants to know if a parent or sibling is OK and they can't use the school's phone because the lines are down, they have theirs.

Of course there is still another side to this story. Cell phones can be a distraction too because students often forget to turn their phones off, so when it goes off it's disrupting the class. Even if students set their phones to silent they can still text, which distracts them from the learning. Cell phones also help the spread of rumors go much quicker. Cell phones might be used for cheating on tests. Despite these points, there are many good reasons to allow cell phones in school.

There may be some problems with bringing phones to school, but there are many more for why you should be able to bring your phones to school. Parents and students can remain calm in emergencies and so they can be used for useful tools in schools. It would be good if cell phones were allowed in school, so the students can use them when they need to. Cell phones should also be allowed so students and parents can feel safe when a crisis happens or they can finish a project on time.


Loading...