Outdoors
OUTDOORS ALASKA JOURNAL OF COMMERCE Editor's note: This is the eighth in the Morris Communications series, "The case for conserving the Kenai king salmon."

Fishermen focus on how ADFG sets, achieves escapement goals

A spawned out sockeye salmon floats in Quartz Creek, an upper tributary to the Kenai River. Making sure the right amount of salmon reach the spawning grounds - known as an escapement goal - is the primary objective for Alaska Department of Fish and Game managers in the summer. That objective is difficult to achieve when sockeye are abundant and king salmon are not, as has been the case in the last several years. The way ADFG sets, and achieves, escapement goals is a matter of much debate because of the impacts on sport and commercial users as well as the impact missed goals can have on future returns.
Scott Dickerson | Alaskastock.com
A spawned out sockeye salmon floats in Quartz Creek, an upper tributary to the Kenai River. Making sure the right amount of salmon reach the spawning grounds - known as an escapement goal - is the primary objective for Alaska Department of Fish and Game managers in the summer. That objective is difficult to achieve when sockeye are abundant and king salmon are not, as has been the case in the last several years. The way ADFG sets, and achieves, escapement goals is a matter of much debate because of the impacts on sport and commercial users as well as the impact missed goals can have on future returns.
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