Outdoors
OUTDOORS Morris News Service-Alaska/Peninsula Clarion Editor's note: This is the third in the Morris Communications series "The case for conserving the Kenai king salmon."

Kings drive news, sockeyes drive Inlet economy

Dipnetters ignore the rain as they crowd the mouth of the Kenai River Sunday, July 18, 2004, trying to net their limit of red salmon swimming up the river in Kenai, Alaska. A larger than usual number of sockeye have returned to the Kenai and Kasil of River drawing hundreds of dippnetters and anglers to the Kenai Peninsula trying to fill their freezers. Only Alaska residents are allowed to participate in the annual personal use fishery, which allows the head of a household to catch 25 fish and 10 fish for each member of the family. Anglers are allowed to keep three fish a day.
Dipnetters ignore the rain as they crowd the mouth of the Kenai River Sunday, July 18, 2004, trying to net their limit of red salmon swimming up the river in Kenai, Alaska. A larger than usual number of sockeye have returned to the Kenai and Kasil of River drawing hundreds of dippnetters and anglers to the Kenai Peninsula trying to fill their freezers. Only Alaska residents are allowed to participate in the annual personal use fishery, which allows the head of a household to catch 25 fish and 10 fish for each member of the family. Anglers are allowed to keep three fish a day.
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