Outdoors
OUTDOORS Morris News Service-Alaska/Peninsula Clarion Editor's note: This is the third in the Morris Communications series "The case for conserving the Kenai king salmon."

Kings drive news, sockeyes drive Inlet economy

Droves of dipnetters crowd the beach along the Kenai River this past summer looking to fill their freezers with sockeye salmon in the personal use fishery open only to Alaska residents. The 2013 season featured a single-day record of nearly 250,000 sockeye entering the river on July 16, but many who missed out on that Tuesday bonanza had difficulty reaching their limit of 25 reds for a head of household and 10 for each additional family member.
Droves of dipnetters crowd the beach along the Kenai River this past summer looking to fill their freezers with sockeye salmon in the personal use fishery open only to Alaska residents. The 2013 season featured a single-day record of nearly 250,000 sockeye entering the river on July 16, but many who missed out on that Tuesday bonanza had difficulty reaching their limit of 25 reds for a head of household and 10 for each additional family member.
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