Outdoors
OUTDOORS Capital City Weekly With the month of March nearing its end, it won't be too long before our regional lakes begin their annual spring break up. During this time of the year as daylight hours in Southeast Alaska quietly begin to lengthen and days become warmer, outlet streams and watersheds will soon become revived after a long winter hiatus by fresh run off, triggering a series of biological events. Of these major events, one that excites fly-fishers and sends their casting arms into autonomic twitches centers around all the salmon that spawned in our systems last summer and fall and that is the emergence of salmon fry.

Spring run off - Alevins and fry

Both stages of salmon, Alevins and fry,  are highly vulnerable to predation and Dolly Varden and coastal cutthroat trout feed on them in binge-like fashion during the spring run-off.
Photo By Rich Culver
Both stages of salmon, Alevins and fry, are highly vulnerable to predation and Dolly Varden and coastal cutthroat trout feed on them in binge-like fashion during the spring run-off.
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